UnApologetic

Christian Theology and Apologetics

Archive for the tag “Apologetics”

Attributes of God: Incorporeality Part 1

Traditional Christianity affirms that God is an immaterial, nonphysical reality. This is to say that God is formless or “without body.”[1] Christianity has historically opposed material conceptions of God and instead posited that God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are lacking any material structure or composition, that is apart from the incarnation of Christ. Among the attributes of God, incorporeality is a negative attribute, unlike the others, which ascribe God to possess something. Incorporeality states there is something God does not have—a body. Read more…

Attributes of God: Omnipotence

In traditional theism, God is thought to be the greatest conceivable being. Philosophers and theologians alike posit that a maximally great being would possess certain great-making properties such as omnipotence, omnibenevolence, omniscience, aseity, and so on.[1] Read more…

Two Birds, One Stone, and Lots of Fallacies: A Response to Lawrence Krauss

The SCOTUS decision on same-sex marriage has been reignited recently by the story of Kentucky clerk Kim Davis and her subsequent incarceration and release from prison. Everyone has some commentary on this situation, even Cosmologist Lawrence Krauss. This paper is a response to Krauss’ article titled “All Scientists Should be Militant Atheists”  published at The New Yorker. Read more…

A Historical Approach to the Resurrection of Jesus: Part 6

In the last part I went through the biblical data pertinent to the investigation of the women’s discovery of the empty tomb and took that data and plugged it into a Bayes Factor to decipher the probability of R (Resurrection) over ~R (Resurrection Alternatives). Part six will take the salient facts concerning the Disciples and this will be run through a Bayes Factor as well. Read more…

A Historical Approach to the Resurrection of Jesus: Part 5 Bayes Theorem

Part 5

Bayes Theorem

In the first four parts to this series the evidence pertinent to Jesus’ crucifixion and entombment was examined and deemed historical credible; no serious scholar denies this. Read more…

A Historical Approach to the Resurrection of Jesus: Part 4

James the Skeptical. There is biblical evidence that James (Jesus’ brother) was not actually a follower of Christ early on. When Christ traveled back to his home a large crowd assembled to hear him teach. Those close to him (presumably his brothers or disciples) come to take custody of him because they believe he has lost his senses (Mk 3:20-21).[1] R. T. France remarks, “If the disciples are with Jesus in the house, they could not ‘go out’ to seize him, nor is the idea of the disciples manhandling Jesus one which easily fits into the Marcan account so far. Read more…

A Historical Approach to the Resurrection of Jesus: Part 3

 

Significant Conversions

Paul. Earlier I discussed the death of Paul as recorded by Clement and how this Apostle suffered while alive and was martyred for his faith in Christ. What is truly remarkable about Paul is that originally he was an enemy to the church. He persecuted the early Christians; in fact, he was present at the stoning of Stephen (Ac 7:58-8:4). Read more…

A Historical Approach to the Resurrection of Jesus: Part 2

First Witnesses

The fist eyewitnesses to the empty tomb were women. This is very difficult to deny historically as it is independently reported in Mark 16:1-8; Luke 24:1-11; and John 20:1-18. Though there are variances in the accounts regarding the named individuals present during the discovery of the empty tomb, the fact that women found the empty tomb is virtually undeniable. Read more…

A Historical Approach to the Resurrection of Jesus: Part 1

Perhaps no other event in history has shaped the world in the way the resurrection of Jesus has. Over a billion people on this planet believe the resurrection occurred over two thousand years ago in Jerusalem. That being said, we must take note that belief in something does not make it true, or false; what makes the resurrection true or false is whether or not it occurred. Read more…

How Can a Loving God Allow Such Evil?

 

the-problem-of-evilIn popular culture it is often asked, “if there is a God, why is there so much evil in the world?” Thus, many see the existence of evil as somehow incompatible with the existence of an omnibenevolent being (God). C. S. Lewis properly identified the problem of evil as the problem of pain.[1] Read more…

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